COMPLEMENT MAP DATABASE  

General Questions


1. What do the different symbols on the network map mean?

2. How to zoom or pan network maps, any shortcut key?

3. How did you decide which interactions will be included in the network maps?

4. Are all interactions validated?

5. Are the network maps complete?



Answers


1. What do the different symbols on the network map mean?

    Descriptions of different symbols are listed below. You can also find the legend box describing the symbols and color codes for each network in the bottom left or bottom right corner of the corresponding map.

            

2. How to zoom or pan network maps, any shortcut key?

    There are several options to navigate and explore the network maps. To zoom a map, you may use the scroll wheel of your mouse or swipe up and down with two fingers on your track pad (on certain systems). or the navigation panel under the map. To pan a map, click and hold the left mouse button and drag the map; alternatively, you may drag the red box on the little overview map at the bottom right corner of each map window. For your convenience, there is a navigation panel at the bottom of each map that provides easy access to the navigation functions:

            

    Finally, there are also several shortcut keys available that allow zooming or panning the map via the keyboard:

            

3. How did you decide which interactions will be included in the network maps?

    For generating the main map, we extensively searched literature repositories for reported interactions between complement components and with other endogenous and exogenous partners. The main criteria for inclusion were the interaction was direct and that is was determined using an established method of biomolecular interaction analysis. Each report was viewed by experienced researchers in the complement field and the corresponding reference (and the methods used to describe the individual interaction) are linked in the database. In case of the functional network maps (Coagulation, Cancer, etc.) some indirect relations may be shown but are clearly marked as such (i.e., using a different linker line/symbol).


4. Are all interactions validated?

    The primary aim of this database is to visualize the extensive interaction network of the complement system and stimulate ideas for performing scientific projects. Although each reported interaction has been carefully viewed for presence of the reported data and use of an appropriate interaction analysis method, we did not attempt to assess the quality of the reported data nor did we reproduce the interaction analysis. In principle, every interaction that has been reported using suitable methods has been included in the database. The validity of the links therefore relies on the quality control applied during the experiments and the peer reviewing process. In the case of controversial interaction data, we do show the link and include both the supporting and the challenging reports. We therefore strongly advise to view all assigned references on an individual link shown in the network map before using this information for research projects.


5. Are the network maps complete?

    The complement field is highly dynamic and new or updated information about complement interactions and functions are reported at a rapid pace. While we aim to keep the database up-to-date, we very much appreciate all the help and support we can get from researchers like you. Please use the "Feedback" button in the header of this website in the case you discovered a new or missing link that should be included in the database. The same form can be used to report errors or missing information/referenced concerning an existing interaction link. Thank you very much in advance.


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